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ADELAIDE ARCHITECTS SWIMMING POOL & SPA for a SLOPING SITE: CONSTRUCTION PICTURES

 
 
 



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The swimming pools stainless steel Balustrade posts were set into pockets cast in the hob. I used construction grout, a type of fast setting super strong flowable grout, to fix the post. Wedges held everything in place during setting.
The swimming pools s...
The stringlines shown here were for setting out the pool coping. I covered up small irregularities in the shell by slightly increasing or decreasing the ovehang of the bullnose edges on each side of the pool to get a line of best fit.
The stringlines show...
Setting out the pool coping involved mitering the point where the bullnose edges meet and removing the rest of the bullnose on one tile to form a straight joint
Setting out the pool...
The Pool balustrade was to have a 50mm handrail on 40mm posts. I clamped everything together before pouring the grout around the posts to ensure an easier job for the welder. I got the welder to place the 3 missing steel posts that I had already mounted baseplates for, then the toprail of the balustrade was welded onto the tops of the balustrade posts and to the steel columns either end.
The Pool balustrade ...
Qpebble render is applied here, but not yet acid washed down. The acid washing further exposes and cleans the aggregate. Qpebble is a modern form of the old fashioned pebble-crete. A smaller aggregate that is 3mm max size is used and the cement matrix has acrylic additives and is coloured to choice. I used this as there have been some problems with some of the newer pool rendering compounds especially when combined with Ioniser sanitising systems
Qpebble render is ap...
I had 2 days to fix the balustrade before the pool had to be filled. The Qpebble like many render systems cannot be exposed to the atmosphere for any prolonged periods. If the pool is left drained for two long the render will crack and spall.
I had 2 days to fix ...
After the acid washing the pool is filled. Note I have temporary mdf panels in the balustrade while I wait on the glass. I took these panels to the glazier and they were used as templates.
After the acid washi...
My pool plantroom was a bit tricky to understand at first as I required many combinations of heating and filtering between both the spa and pool. I carefully labeled each valve and pipes direction of flow. I used an Enviroswim ioniser. Theoretically no further sanitising chemicals are required. 2 Davey Silensor pumps were used one for the solar system and the other for filtration and then spa. The box at the top right hand side is the swimming pool Distribution board. The 2 black boxes under are the transformers for the lights. I have only 2 pool lights, one in the spa and one in the pool. I chose halogen lights as led lights have shown to be unreliable and expensive many breaking down in their first seasons use.
My pool plantroom wa...
6.38 laminated glass was set in aluminium channel. These channels were fixed to the stainless steel balustrade sections with stainless steel screws.
6.38 laminated glass...
A permapine retaining wall was used against the steel posts supporting the end of the pool. This enabled a new garden bed to be planted that integrates the pool better into the landscape and provides a space against the pool for future plumbing access.  The two black objects adjacent the ends of the retaining wall are valves for the swimjets which are yet to be installed.
A permapine retainin...
I used an acrylic render on the pool hob to provide a true surface for tiling. Note the solar blanket on the pool. A receipt for a solar blanket is required before the pool can be filled. Sizing your pool to fit a standard solar blankets modular component width will save some money.
I used an acrylic re...
The pool hob was a module of the tile height. I chose blue tiles and grey grout as these should never date.  Slate grey Silicone was used around the columns and between the pool coping joints at strategic locations.
The pool hob was a m...
Tiling for the back hob was set out from the central columns. This meant I could have 2 full tiles on the column and silicone tile joint either side, as movement would crack any tiles that bridged between the column and conrete hob.
Tiling for the back ...
Integrating the pool into the garden is important. A glimpse of the pool in the background entices guests to explore the sequence of 3 small brick patios between the front yard and the pool
Integrating the pool...
Plum blossom adjacent the pool edge is worth the bother of a few petals in the water. The elevated position of the pool and the surrounding tiled hob stops most debris from dirtying the pool
Plum blossom adjacen...
The pool from the fist floor balcony. Note the 7,000 litre Galvanised Corrugated steel rainwater tank next to the pool. This will help with top-ups during summer.
The pool from the fi...
The spa has an adjacent sitting area. When the proposed glazed room enclosing the pool is finished this will be next to the entry door for easy access of the most used part of the pool.
The spa has an adjac...
The spa and the pool are both heated by a solar pool heater on the second storey roof. Although not optimal in its location (the roof is flat which reduces the amount of solar radiation it recieves) the spa can get to over 40 degrees on a warm day and I had to install an automatic temperature (solar)controller to stop the spa from getting too hot. On a typical day I run the solar return into the spa and use the overflow edge to then fill up the pool. By a series of valves I can isolate the pool from the spa and heat either of them individually or together.
The spa and the pool...
Steel in a corrosive environment such as a swimming pool enclosure needs to be properly protected otherwise corrosion will ruin it within months. This steel was grit blasted and inorganic zinc silicate (grey in foreground)applied in the shop. On site I applied the subsequent coats to the beams with a roller in a wind protected well ventilated open verandah before the steel was lifted in place. 6 coats of epoxy paint were applied. The first 2 of primer (yellow) then 2 build coats (white) then the top coats for the colour and weather protection. The top coat I applied in two slightly different shades to make sure that the second coat was even and nothing missed. The green pad is needed to wash down the inorganic zinc silicate to remove the chalky salts that build up over time. Note that because the frame is welded I stopped the paint short of the ends of the steel beam so that it would not become heat effected and ruined. All joints needed to be ground down and an additional coat of epoxy zinc primer applied before the top six coats could be put on to these joints. This specification is similar to that used on oil rigs. It may seem overkill but it needs to last the life of the structure. Imagine having to paint this again once the roof cladding has been put on! The paint cost around $3000 all up. Wattyl prepared the specification for me. The paint MSDS required me to wear a respirator, goggles & gloves due to the cyanide compounds in the topcoat. The thinners for the two base coats were also quite poisonous and also required full safety gear including respirator. It may be inconvenient and hot but do not try this without the proper equipment. I poisoned myself using an isocyanate containing epoxy clear coat on a parquet floor years ago and can assure you that you do not want to take the risk
Steel in a corrosive...
A closeup of the box gutter between the house and the steel breezway frame. Folded zincalume was used for the gutter.
A closeup of the box...
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This Architect Designed Pool in Outer Metropolitan Adelaide was an Owner Builder Project

I drew the plans and provided much of the labor myself, providing a cost saving of around 50%
This Swimming Pool is situated on a hill with a 1 in 3 fall. The site is tiered and over 50 stairs have to be negotiated from the street. Due to the difficulty of site access all materials had to be carried in by hand. The site was also excavated by hand. Provision for a fully enclosed glazed structure around the pool complicated the build by imposing additional structural requirements.
I designed a concrete shell as this could be used as footings for the room over. The structural Engineer advised to found the pool on natural ground.  This advice meant that some structural savings could be made. Instead of having to use piers, a series of strip footings could be used to key the pool into the hillside.  By following this concept the design of the pool became what is known in the industry as a "split level pool." This means that the depth increases from side to side rather than end to end. This has the advantage of giving a fairly continuous depth swimming lane for the entire length of the pool.
There were serious space constraints due to the existing house and garden layout, and an existing sewer easement at the rear of the property that had to be avoided. The room over is still under construction. If you live in Adelaide and are thinking of putting in a pool or pool enclosure - email grantluc@grantlucasarchitect.com.au  I will make sure your pool suits your site and integrates into your garden. An architect designed pool is the difference between a suit off the rack or one tailor made..... and the best bit is that if you have your own plans you can shop around for the best price.  
 
 Pool Type:             Spray Concrete shell - half in ground                 Pool Fitout:         Tiled spa & spill-edge, swimjets
 Pool Finish:           Qpebble (blue) and tiles                                     Pool Coping:       500x500 Quantum stone (grey)
 Pool Size:            8.8m x 3.8m x 2.2 deep                                    Pool Room Size:  11m x4.9m plus entry plus breezway
 
 
 
CONSTRUCTION TIME-LINE                                                        
June 2008:                    Building Approval                                                        
November 2008:          Footings Poured                                              
March 2009:                 Shell form-work and Reinforcement                   
April 2009:                   Concrete Sprayed                                                
December 2009:          Filled
March 2010:                 Epoxy paint to enclosure over finished                                Back to pool home page