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ADELAIDE ARCHITECTS SWIMMING POOL & SPA for a SLOPING SITE: CONSTRUCTION PICTURES

 
 
 



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Preliminary Siteworks were required above the pool to divert water away from the digging
Preliminary Sitework...
Excavation begins. Poor site access meant this was all done by hand....a long process with a pick and shovel.
Excavation begins. P...
Six small trees had to be removed to clear the site
Six small trees had ...
Be Green. Waste nothing! One large tree unfortunately had to go. It was an Alepo Pine, so technically almost a weed. Permission was obtained from council for its removal and a specialist climber hired to fell it. I purchased a chain saw and cut up the logs which are to be used as Firewood. These can be seen stacked in the backgound
Be Green. Waste noth...
The footing trenches can be seen here. These are to key the concrete shell into the slope and stop the pool from moving down the hill.
The footing trenches...
Base-plates needed to be set in place as fixing points for the columns to the proposed pool enclosure. This is a column to the pool entry area. As this was on the high side of the pool the ground was fill from the original cut and fill when the house was built. To ensure the baseplate was in the correct location it was welded onto a small stub column to tranfer the loads below natural ground and some speedset was used to set it in position.
Base-plates needed t...
All the reinforcing had to be carried in by hand. I drew up the shapes I needed, did a take-off and faxed the order through. I used Bianco for the steel. They were competitive in price and had prompt delivery.
All the reinforcing ...
My mates helping me get the reinforcement in place. These were long deep trenches and lots of manpower was needed to get everthing in place
My mates helping me ...
Close-up of the top strip footing. The bars sticking out will be used to tie the main shell reinforcing and the strip footing together.
Close-up of the top ...
Shell Reinforcing in place. Note the formwork in the foreground. This was required for an additional strip footing that ties into the pool footings providing a firm base for the columns of the future pool enclosure.
Shell Reinforcing in...
The stepped strip footing formwork at a step, showing the y12 steel in place.
The stepped strip fo...
The stepped strip footing. A mirror image footing to this is on the other end of the pool.
The stepped strip fo...
Pool strip footing after concrete pour. The concrete for the londitudinal footings had to he roughened on the top to key better into the concrete shell when it is poured. The steel shown exposed is used to tie into the shell reinforcing and keep it up off the soil.
Pool strip footing a...
The stepped footing showing a baseplate for one of the columns  after the concrete pour. These plates provide welding points for the columns and allow greater tolerances than hold down bolts.
The stepped footing ...
The pool site shown in entitity after the footing concrete pour. Welding to fix the columns has started. Note the small slab at the top. Always prepare a spot for the truck to get rid of the extra concrete otherwise you will have to dump it. This slab was finished during the shell pour and forms the toe of a concrete retaining wall holding back the brick patio above.
The pool site shown ...
Overview of pool site showing steel columns and beam
Overview of pool sit...
Overview of pool site. Note the plastic yellow safety ends now placed on the reinforcing.
Overview of pool sit...
The formwork used for the pool was good quality second hand corrugated roofing iron
The formwork used fo...
The corrugated iron formwork was held in place by a series of y12 reinforcing rods bent and tied together to brace the structure during the concrete spraying. When finished this provides a suprisingly strong structure and is a cheap solution. If possible have another place you can use this reinforcing in at the end of the job as about $1000 of rods was used just as bracing.
The corrugated iron ...
The pool formwork shown with the edge boards in place ready to spray. The edgebeam for this pool was thickened horizontally to enable a good width for walking around the pool once the room is built. This cantelevers past the edge of the concrete walls and complicated the formwork greatly
The pool formwork sh...
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This Architect Designed Pool in Outer Metropolitan Adelaide was an Owner Builder Project

I drew the plans and provided much of the labor myself, providing a cost saving of around 50%
This Swimming Pool is situated on a hill with a 1 in 3 fall. The site is tiered and over 50 stairs have to be negotiated from the street. Due to the difficulty of site access all materials had to be carried in by hand. The site was also excavated by hand. Provision for a fully enclosed glazed structure around the pool complicated the build by imposing additional structural requirements.
I designed a concrete shell as this could be used as footings for the room over. The structural Engineer advised to found the pool on natural ground.  This advice meant that some structural savings could be made. Instead of having to use piers, a series of strip footings could be used to key the pool into the hillside.  By following this concept the design of the pool became what is known in the industry as a "split level pool." This means that the depth increases from side to side rather than end to end. This has the advantage of giving a fairly continuous depth swimming lane for the entire length of the pool.
There were serious space constraints due to the existing house and garden layout, and an existing sewer easement at the rear of the property that had to be avoided. The room over is still under construction. If you live in Adelaide and are thinking of putting in a pool or pool enclosure - email grantluc@grantlucasarchitect.com.au  I will make sure your pool suits your site and integrates into your garden. An architect designed pool is the difference between a suit off the rack or one tailor made..... and the best bit is that if you have your own plans you can shop around for the best price.  
 
 Pool Type:             Spray Concrete shell - half in ground                 Pool Fitout:         Tiled spa & spill-edge, swimjets
 Pool Finish:           Qpebble (blue) and tiles                                     Pool Coping:       500x500 Quantum stone (grey)
 Pool Size:            8.8m x 3.8m x 2.2 deep                                    Pool Room Size:  11m x4.9m plus entry plus breezway
 
 
 
CONSTRUCTION TIME-LINE                                                        
June 2008:                    Building Approval                                                        
November 2008:          Footings Poured                                              
March 2009:                 Shell form-work and Reinforcement                   
April 2009:                   Concrete Sprayed                                                
December 2009:          Filled
March 2010:                 Epoxy paint to enclosure over finished                                Back to pool home page